RSS Feed

Violation of Trust (1995): A Mighty Wind

Steven J. Allen, Violation of Trust (The Seniors Coalition, 1995)

[originally posted 12Mar2001]

A fault line runs across the book's cover.

The only picture I could find on the net was extremely small and I haven’t had a copy of this for over a decade, so sorry for the blurriness.
photo credit: bookbyte.com

It seems the simplest of questions, and yet the answer is anything but simple: where do the tax dollars you pay into Social Security go, and does the government really guarantee you’ll get that money back?

Steven Allen gives us an overview of the answer in Violation of Trust, and what he’s saying is nothing terribly new to an American public that hasn’t trusted the government in decades, but the mechanisms the government has used over the years, from the very passing of the laws that brought Social Security into existence, read like a primer on why centralized government has never been the best answer for how to run the country.

This book was commissioned by a Washington special interest group, and so there’s a rather unacceptable amount of horn-blowing about the greatness of the Seniors Coalition and how they’ve been fighting the good fight, etc. etc. ad nauseam, but if you can get past the rhetoric, there’s a good deal of actual worthwhile information here. The book is somewhat dated by necessity (the Balanced Budget Amendment was passed a few months after this came out, and Allen holds out hope that the BBA will help save Social Security a number of times throughout), it’s worth a few hours of perusal. If nothing else, you’ll come away with a better understanding of why you never quite trusted the government. ** ½

About Robert "Goat" Beveridge

Media critic (amateur, semi-pro, and for one brief shining moment in 2000 pro) since 1986. Guy behind noise/powerelectronics band XTerminal (after many small stints in jazz, rock, and metal bands). Known for being tactless but honest.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: